Sunday, February 26, 2012

Ros & Guil

I thought Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead was quite an intriguing play. I liked how I could remember certain bits of dialogue from the actual Hamlet, for example when Hamlet called Ros & Guil "sponges". I thought a lot of the witty banter was pretty funny too, but I think that it would have been even funnier to watch because that sort of thing translates better on the stage. I loved having a behind the scenes look at why Tom Stoppard supposedly believed that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern died. I think Hamlet being the culprit in that situation adds another dimension to his character. He had trouble bringing himself to kill Claudius, but very little when it came to indirectly executing his own friends.

2 comments:

Mallory said...

The intertextuality of the play is very interesting because it comes directly from Hamlet. It is interesting to see the direct relations between the two plays

christine said...

I agree Meredith. It's weird how easily he was ready to betray his old friends and how hesitant he was to kill the man that murdered his father. I feel like he's awful at keeping relationships (first Ophelia, now Ros and Guil). Maybe he's in a Wasteland of his own...