Friday, February 10, 2012

No Exit: Set

I think that visualizing the set is very important when it comes to reading a play. Here are some images I pulled up of the set of No Exit. Ours looked very different when we did it, but then again, no two sets are exactly the same. We created a creepier version of the "Hell Hotel" that Garcin, Inez, and Estelle inhabit.






I kind of love the minimalism of the second one, but then again, it pretty much left out the whole Second Empire drawing room thing...

5 comments:

Mallory said...

Being able to visualize the set up of this play really helps to understand the entire play better. I think it is important to keep the Second Empire drawing room, because there is so much emphasis on it during the beginning. I wonder if the awful furniture is another thing that they must suffer through in Hell or if that even matters.

christine said...

I agree, it gives the audience a much better feel of whats occurring. The Second empire drawing room is crucial in my opinion. I feel like the furniture could very well serve as one of the "torture devices" in Sartre's hell.

christine said...

In my head, i imagined the setting to look like this:
http://centerforlawandreligion.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/774.jpg

minus the mirror and windows of course.

Ravin S said...

I agree that the setting is very important, but not for this play in particular. I mean Sartre wants the audience to fully understand the connections between the three people. As Fleming pointed out "Hell is--other people". That's the most important thing we have to see in Sartre's hell.

alyb said...

I think the minimalism really plays an important role. It is obvious that the characters would have nothing to do in this room besides talk to each other. This would make it impossible for them to ignore eachother like Garcin wanted thus making their hell impossible to avoid.