Friday, October 25, 2013

Dali's Illustrations





While I was looking at some of the other posts, I noticed one of Salvador Dali's illustrations over the post. Since Dali is one of my favorite artists, I could not help adding some more of his pictures. I think his pictures are really weird, but that just makes them more interesting. Also, he has one of the greatest mustaches I've ever seen. There are, of course, a lot more than the ones I've shown, but I couldn't possibly put them all; they are definitely worth looking up, though.
Antaeus


Dante
The Neglectful
L'ange dechu




6 comments:

Miranda Martinez said...

I really like the Dante illustration! It seems oddly fitting that he's approaching what seems to be a darkness, or Hell.

The fallen angel illustration however, is slightly befuddling to me. I don't quite understand why there are drawers. Perhaps I'm analyzing it in a logical and straightforward manner, and there's some deeper meaning that I'm missing, but I just don't get it.

Kincy GIbson said...

The piece of Dante is the most realistic of the pictures Joey put up. The way I pictured many of Dante's scenes is very different than the way Dali did, especially the one of Count Ugolino eating out Ruggieri's brain. I imaged a ravenous vampire like figure thrashing at Ruggieri's head. I definitely didn't picture two deflated balloon faces surrounded by colors of yellow. I imagined a very grey, blue, and icy scene.

Kincy GIbson said...

The piece of Dante is the most realistic of the pictures Joey put up. The way I pictured many of Dante's scenes is very different than the way Dali did, especially the one of Count Ugolino eating out Ruggieri's brain. I imaged a ravenous vampire like figure thrashing at Ruggieri's head. I definitely didn't picture two deflated balloon faces surrounded by colors of yellow. I imagined a very grey, blue, and icy scene.

Samantha Gillen said...

I like the first one the best. I'm just as confused about the fallen angel as Miranda is... I don't understand the drawers. I agree with Kincy about the way Dali depicted the brain eating scene. I imagined a more savage scene mainly composed of cool colors since they are frozen in a lake. I pictured the blood and bodies as warm colors, but I imagined the surroundings would be composed mainly of greys, blues, greens, etc.

Megan Hoolahan said...

Like Miranda, I'm a little confused by the drawers. They are also slightly disturbing. But I think this disturbing interpretation is what makes this piece so interesting. It's interesting to see Dali's interpretations of the scenes because they are so different from anything that anyone else would imagine.

Ian Kuehne said...

I think that what makes Dali's surrealism so strikingly bizarre is his selective omission of realistic details, and his inclusion of very lifelike details of impossible objects. For example, in the illustration of Ugolino and Ruggieri, the landscape, eyes and skin are totally featureless, but Dali paid a great deal of attention to the grotesque, lamprey-like mouths and the repulsive, floppy emptiness of the faces. Much like Dore's use of light to draw attention to a single point, Dali uses these details to draw attention to certain aspects of his portrayals.