Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Religion And English Connections

It's been great that throughout this school year I have been able to see a large amount of connections between my religion class and Humanities. Upon reading last night, I was immediately able to recognize the letter written by Nadir Khan that said "I divorce thee" three times. This was a big deal in our religion class because we talked about how crazy it was that in the Islam religion, women are treated very differently than men. All the man has to do is say that he wants to divorce the woman and she has no say. This perfectly describes the divorce that we see in Midnight''s Children. I've witnessed many great connections throughout the year with English and Religion and it really enhances my experience in each class.

6 comments:

Jaclyn Murphy said...

I was literally thinking the exact same thing in class today!! I remember taking religion in 10th grade and feeling the exact same feeling of surprise. The muslim culture is very different than the western culture, and when I heard Fr. Millican ranting about that I was sooo mad. I could not believe that women were not treated equally as men in marriage. I know it is very different in American than the majority of the world, thus I am biased. However, reading Midnight's children continues to remind me of this and my privileges.

master123 said...

When I read that part of the book I didn't take it as simply that he was just done with her, I saw it as a sparing. We know from reading the book Nadir had to run away because Emerald told on his where about to her fiancé, the General. Nadir had to escape persecution and was doing, in maybe in his head, a good thing form Amina, because if he took her with him she would also be a fugitive. Yes, I do find it interesting they didn't need an legal work for a divorce, like in today world. In the 1940s in america divorce might have been much more easier too, not as simple as writing a note, but i would assume that women had less say in those days considering divorce like the indian wives.

but maybe i'm wrong about everything I just said

Abbey said...

I took graduation pictures today and thought about my time in high school and everything I've learned. I thought about how much we've read just in English alone. I'll see things in my daily life and a lot of the times (maybe because I'm a nerd) I'll relate it back to something we read in class. Everything we read is all different but it's all the same--meaning that we do read a lot of the same common topics, but the themes are delivered in different ways. I can't really put it into words, but this just points out the power of literature.

Cheyenne Dwyer said...

Religion has definitely helped me prepare so much for Humanities. I would not do as well on the background information without it. It's also really nice to use Humanities as a refresher for religion. While I agree with you and the gender differences, I feel like the situation was either him sparing her or him just running away and being done with her in general to move on with his life.

madison kahn said...

I didn't even think about that fact, Abbey. A lot of the things we're doing this year have to do with what we learned in religion. For example, the fact that alcohol is forbidden in Islam is pretty interesting to me. Think about the fact that in Christianity we use wine to represent Jesus's blood. Christians, in this sense, condone the use of alcohol. Granted, it is a small amount. But, regardless, it's a pretty interesting thing.

Ashley Bossier said...

I think love is inevitable. Not in a sexual way but I think everyone is surrounded by love. We have our friends and family that have loved us for many years. Everywhere you look love is present. It's instinctive to love someone it's not a choice. You form a bond with people around you and you learn to love them. I understand when they say to love piece by piece. That's what love is like.