Friday, December 4, 2015

I CAN'T WITH CANDIDE

CAPS BECAUSE ANGRY!!!

CANDIDE HAS BEEN OBSESSING OVER CUNEGONDE IN EVERY FREAKING CHAPTER ONLY TO COME TO THE CONCLUSION THAT HE DOESN'T EVEN WANT TO MARRY HER ANYMORE BECAUSE SHE'S OLD AND UGLY.

IS THIS A JOKE.

In the beginning, I felt bad for Candide because so many bad things would happen to him and he didn't deserve them. As the novella progressed, Candide became a little more deserving of his punishments (see my previous blog post for an example). At this point, I am completely over feeling bad for Candide. He's so annoying with all of his obsessing over Pangloss' theories, Cunegonde's love, optimism, etc. I'm not sure if Voltaire was trying to evoke this feeling from the reader or do the complete opposite. What do y'all think his intentions were?

3 comments:

master123 said...

Candide's naiveness, and constant whining has gotten me frustrated as well. I think that Voltaire has made Candide this way as another jab to humanity. Candide's philosophy on life is that of Dr. Pangloss, which is overly optimistic, but Candid's problem is that he uses this philosophy as a crutch. Candide is unable to think for himself. Even though Candide is traveling the world and seeing new things, he is sticking to the philosophy he was born into. I feel that Voltaire has made Candid this way to show his audience that he believe most people are this way and that they should stop closing their minds off to new ideas or discard them as foolishness because they do not fit into their mold of the world.

Sri Korrapati said...

Abbey, I'm so sorry you have lost the ability to can.

Antonio Imbornone said...

I understand your frustration with Candide, I actually felt the same way upon reading it. But I would like to call upon you at this time to think of Candide's reaction to Cunegonde. His withdrawal for his love for her could very well be FOR THE BEST. AHHHH! See what I did there. Dr. Pangloss' philosophy makes a full circle as Candide's immediate reaction to pull out of this relationship is his own "gut" telling him not to go through with it (if my using of the word "gut" confused you, I'm referring to the phrase "trust your gut"). Candide has been blindly searching for Cunegonde, and when he finally finds her he realizes that he actually has no idea who she really is. The two are not fit to be married, and it is Candide's human instinct that causes him to pull out. It is all for the best