Saturday, March 2, 2013

Captain Jack Sparrow

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern seem like they could be assembled into one person, if that makes any sense. Guildenstern would be the superego, the philosophizing part of the human, the more intelligent part. Rosencrantz would represent the ID, the follower and the more moral of the two (Guildenstern kills, yells, and rants). When I think of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern I think of a disassembled person, which reminded me of a sequence from Pirates of the Caribbean with Captain Jack Sparrow acting as multiple people in a confined "box". Much like Rosencrantz describes life as living in a box, Captain Jack Sparrow lives in Davy Jones' "locker". Moreover, Captain Jack Sparrow wonders aimlessly, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern wonder aimlessly. The multiple Captain Jacks scene is a series of small absurdities, which are directly related to theatre of the absurd. I think there are many more similarities between the two, because they are both absurd, strange, and in some way philosophical and likely psychological (split personalities, etc.). 

4 comments:

wkuehne said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sfJwdbpvZcs

Tyler Dean said...

I agree. If only Ros and Guil were drunk all of the time... Needless to say, they are all fools at points in their stories, but they also have some interesting ideas as well. Captain Jack is dumb at some points, but also very insightful at others. Also, the scene you describe with the many jack sparrows is very interesting for it shows the exact situation of one man composed of different people. One difference I see, however, is that Jack sparrow doesnt need to be told what to do; he often sets off on journeys by himself and does whatever he wants to do. Other than that, they are all very similar.

Grant Reggio said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Grant Reggio said...

First of all: Why is the rum gone? Secondly, I see dissimilarities between Rosencrantz and Guildenstern and Captain Jack Sparrow, at least when he's not without his compass, which is the focus of my post. Jack's compass does more than provide a sense of direction, but by always showing the user the direction in which they must go to find that which they seek, the compass provides a sense of direction that is subjectively determined, a privilege more or less that is certainly not granted towards Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.